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Keyboarding

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Teacher-Facing Resources

Type:Lesson

Estimated Time:13 minutes

Grades:2-5

Score Type:Automatically Graded

Work completed by a student will be automatically graded and the grade will be sent to the Learning Management System (LMS) gradebook

Available Language: English


Vocabulary: finger placement, home row keys, key, keyboard, keyboarding, letters, posture, punctuation, reach keys, touch keys


Primary Objectives:

  • Student learns proper posture for keyboarding.
  • Student learns to identify touch keys.
  • Student understands reach keys.
  • Student learns to type basic punctuation (without using the Shift key).
  • Student learns to type home row keys.
  • Student learns to type letters without looking at the keyboard.

Secondary Objectives:

  • Student learns and practices using technology for real-world application.

Subjects:

Ergonomics 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Ergonomics 

Input Devices: Mouse, Keyboard, Remote Control, etc 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Input Devices: Mouse, Keyboard, Remote Control, etc 

Keyboard Use / Input, Output Devices / Proficiency of use

Science > History / Technology / Social Perspectives > Computer Science > Computer skills > Keyboard Use / Input, Output Devices / Proficiency of use

Keyboarding 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Keyboarding 

Listening / Pay Attention

Language Arts > Communication > Media Literacy / Viewing > Comprehension > Listening / Pay Attention

Use Technology when Writing

Language Arts > Computer Literacy Skills > Writing > Use Technology when Writing
  • It might be helpful to post a diagram of a keyboard where students can view it. For this lesson, label the home row, touch keys, and middle keys. Touch keys are the F and J keys, which have raised bumps or lines on them.

  • In this lesson, fingers are numbered to help describe to students which finger to use to type letters. The numbering is from 1 through 4, with Finger 1 being the index finger, Finger 2 the middle finger, Finger 3 the ring finger, and Finger 4 the little finger.

  • You might want to spend time watching students type and encourage them to use correct keyboarding finger placement and posture. While the hunt-and-peck method might seem faster to students at this point, remind them that in the long run, they'll be able to type much faster if they learn proper typing techniques.

  • In the You vs. Kangaroo game at the end of the lesson, students are rewarded with Australian-themed prizes, such as didgeridoos, sport boomerangs, freshwater crocodiles, cork hats, and Waltzing Matilda music boxes. If students do not beat the kangaroo, they receive Vegemite and butter sandwiches, shark-bitten surfboards, and stolen Emu eggs. Each prize is accompanied by a picture and a short description or fact about the item.

  • Students must type 70% of the letters correctly in each exercise to earn a point. Further, students earn 1 point if they beat the kangaroo at the end of the lesson. Students should take the lesson more than once to strengthen their keyboarding proficiency.

  • You might want to have the class work together to create typing exercises for themselves. To do this, write the home row letters on the board. Then have the class work together to create words from the home row letters. Write the words on the board below the home row letters. After the class discussion, have students type the home row letters and words into a word processing document to create a practice sheet. Students should then print their practice sheets and save copies in a folder. Later, after creating practice sheets for subsequent keyboarding lessons, students can combine their practice sheets to form individual or class typing practice books.
S.1.c Students use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.
S.4.b Students select and use digital tools to plan and manage a design process that considers design constraints and calculated risks.
ELA-Literacy.SL.2.2 Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
ELA-Literacy.SL.3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
ELA-Literacy.SL.4.2 Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
ELA-Literacy.SL.5.2 Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
ELA-Literacy.W.2.6 With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
ELA-Literacy.W.3.6 With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
ELA-Literacy.W.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.
ELA-Literacy.W.5.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.