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Teacher-Facing Resources

Type:Application Exercise

Estimated Time:45 minutes

Grades:9-12

Score Type:Mixed Graded

Work completed by a student will be graded through a variety of scoring options including participation, student self-assessment and teacher assessment via rubric to provide flexibility with the type of grade sent to the Learning Management System (LMS) gradebook. Student work may include opened-ended questions, correct/incorrect responses, a final product and/or a self-assessment

Available Language: English


Vocabulary: Computers, Persuasive Letter Writing, Research, Sexting, Word Processing, Word Processing Software, texting


Primary Objectives:

  • Students learn to never send anything by texting that could be used to hurt them or embarrass them
  • Students learn that anything sent electronically such as text and photos can be forwarded and be put online and used to hurt them now or in the future, and remain public for the entire world to see, permanently
  • Students learn to not text or send pictures that they would not want their parents, classmates, school administrators, and the police to read or see, because they will, if someone sends it to them. Risky messages and images can be forwarded to others unbeknownst to the user.
  • Students learn that they could face serious legal consequences if they forward, store, send or post inappropriate photos of themselves or other minors. Students learn not to post their phone number online, or they may be vulnerable to cyberbullying, predators, and scams
  • Students learn that they must never try to hurt someone by texting or sending photos
  • Students learn they must never help someone else hurt someone by texting or sending photos
  • Students learn that they don’t really know for sure if the person texting them is the person that owns the phone
  • Students learn to be cautious if someone they don’t know uses their cell phone because they can impersonate them by making a prank call, texting, or make expensive international calls
  • Students learn that if they let someone they know use their phone, to carefully watch what they do, to make sure they don’t impersonate them
  • Students learn to ignore unexpected links, files, pictures and phone numbers, to only click if they know who sent it and why
  • Students learn to never meet someone in person if they only know them online or by texting
  • Students learn to not text while driving
  • Students learn that excessive texting can cause Texting Teen Tendonitis (TTT), which is the beginning stages of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Students learn the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and that they should tell their parents if they have these symptoms
  • Students learn to use netiquette, use punctuations and emoticons to communicate emotion, never text in all caps as it means shouting
  • Students learn to think before they text, to never text anything they wouldn’t say in person
  • Students learn that they should always think about how someone will feel before they text, they should put themselves in the other person’s place and imagine how they would feel
  • Students learn that they should not text when they are feeling angry
  • Students learn that if someone writes them a message that is meant to make them feel bad, they should show it to a teacher or parent before deleting it, and not reply
  • Students learn to only text or reply to people they know, if they don’t recognize the number, they must ignore the text and try find out who texted them when they are at school the next day

Secondary Objectives:

  • Students demonstrate originality and inventiveness in work.
  • Students develop, implement, and communicate new ideas to others.
  • Students are open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives.
  • Students act on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the domain in which the innovation occurs.
  • Students exercise sound reasoning in understanding.
  • Students make complex choices and decisions.
  • Students understand the interconnections among systems.
  • Students articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing.
  • Students demonstrate creative thinking, constructs knowledge, and develops innovative products and processes using technology. Student applies existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Students uses digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Student interacts, collaborates, and publishes with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
  • Students understand and use technology systems.

Subjects:

Advantages and Disadvantages of Technology Use 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Technology and Society > Advantages and Disadvantages of Technology Use 

Argument

Language Arts > Writing > Topic Development > Elaborate / Develop Ideas / Content > Argument

Argument

Language Arts > Writing > Topic Development > Supporting Details > Argument

Bullying and Harassment

Library Media > Information Technology > Internet > Bullying and Harassment

Bullying and Harassment 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Internet > Bullying and Harassment 

Development of Safe Interactive Environments 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Internet > Development of Safe Interactive Environments 

Digital Citizenship

Library Media > Information Literacy > Student Use - Digital Media > Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship 

Technology Education > Digital Literacy > Student Use > Digital Citizenship 

From Nonfiction Material

Language Arts > Research > Collect Data / Note Taking > Gather Facts Information Highlighting > From Nonfiction Material

Interactive Use 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Internet > Interactive Use 

Internet

Technology Education > Digital Literacy > Reference and Research > Reference Tools > Internet

Internet

Library Media > Information Literacy > Reference and Research > Reference Tools > Internet

Internet Safety

Language Arts > Computer Literacy Skills > Personal Use > Internet Safety

Internet Search Engines

Language Arts > Computer Literacy Skills > Research > Internet Search Engines

Internet Use - Ethical / Safety Issues

Social Studies > Process and Literacy Skills > Social Science - History > Internet Use - Ethical / Safety Issues

Negative Impact

Library Media > Information Technology > Internet > Negative Impact

Negative Impact 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Internet > Negative Impact 

Persuasive

Language Arts > Writing > Letters / Correspondence > Persuasive

Problem Solving

Language Arts > Life Skills Daily Life > Problem Solving

Risks and Benefits of Use 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Mobile Applications > Risks and Benefits of Use 

Safety

Library Media > Information Technology > Internet > Safety

Safety 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Internet > Safety 

Texting

Language Arts > Computer Literacy Skills > Personal Use > Texting

Use Background Knowledge

Language Arts > Writing > Writing Process > Prewrite / Brainstorm > Use Background Knowledge

Uses a Variety of Resources

Language Arts > Research > Reference Materials > Uses a Variety of Resources
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EXCEEDS (4)MEETS (3)APPROACHES (2)DOES NOT MEET (1)
Directions and Participation The student followed all directions and went above and beyond in answering all questions in the assignment.The student followed all directions and answered all questions in the assignment.The student followed most directions and answered most questions in the assignment.The student did not follow directions or answer the questions in the assignment.
Required Final Product Components The final product includes additional elements to enhance the assignment beyond the required components.The final product includes all components required by the assignment.The final product includes most of the components required by the assignment.The final product does not demonstrate the components required by the assignment.
Organization and Originality The final product is exceptionally well designed, includes additional elements, contains no spelling, grammar or punctuation mistakes and reveals student’s creative insights into the assignment.The final product is neat, includes all components required by the assignment, contains minimal spelling, grammar or punctuation mistakes and includes some creative elements.The final product is adequate but lacks neatness and creativity, contains some spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes and is missing required components.The final product is not neat or creative, is missing required components and contains many spelling, grammar or punctuation mistakes.
Digital Literacy Skills Application The final product clearly demonstrates an accurate and deep level of understanding of the concept.The final product demonstrates an accurate and appropriate level of understanding of the concept.The final product demonstrates some understanding of the concept.The final product demonstrates little to no understanding of the concept.
S.2.a Students cultivate and manage their digital identity and reputation and are aware of the permanence of their actions in the digital world.
S.2.b Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.
S.2.d Students manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy and security and are aware of data-collection technology used to track their navigation online.
S.3.c Students curate information from digital resources using a variety of tools and methods to create collections of artifacts that demonstrate meaningful connections or conclusions.
S.3.d Students build knowledge by actively exploring real-world issues and problems, developing ideas and theories and pursuing answers and solutions.
S.4.a Students know and use a deliberate design process for generating ideas, testing theories, creating innovative artifacts or solving authentic problems.
S.4.d Students exhibit a tolerance for ambiguity, perseverance and the capacity to work with open-ended problems.
S.5.a Students formulate problem definitions suited for technology-assisted methods such as data analysis, abstract models and algorithmic thinking in exploring and finding solutions.
S.5.b Students collect data or identify relevant data sets, use digital tools to analyze them, and represent data in various ways to facilitate problem-solving and decision-making.
S.5.c Students break problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand complex systems or facilitate problem-solving.
S.7.d Students explore local and global issues and use collaborative technologies to work with others to investigate solutions.
ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1a Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
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