Teacher-Facing Resources

Type:Lesson

Estimated Time:9 minutes

Grades:K-2

Score Type:Automatically Graded

Work completed by a student will be automatically graded and the grade will be sent to the Learning Management System (LMS) gradebook

Available Languages: English, Spanish


Vocabulary: computer, input device, keyboard, monitor, mouse, output device, printer, processor, speakers


Primary Objectives:

  • Student becomes familiar with the components of a computer.
  • Student learns to identify components of a computer and their uses.
  • Student understands the concept of input ("the senses") vs. output ("communication") in regards to computer devices.
  • Student becomes familiar with the concept of a processor ("the brain").
  • Student learns to properly care for a computer.
  • Student learns to identify input, output, and processing devices.

Secondary Objectives:

  • Student practices memory skills.
  • Student practices cognitive thinking by identifying objects based on an understanding of the tasks the objects perform.
  • Student develops vocabulary across the curriculum.

Subjects:

Abbreviations

Language Arts > Writing > Grammar / Language Structure > Mechanics / Punctuation > Abbreviations

Diagrams of

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Hardware Components and Identification > Diagrams of

Hardware / Software Applications

Language Arts > Computer Literacy Skills > Personal Use > Hardware / Software Applications

Hardware Identification 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Hardware Identification 

Input Devices: Mouse, Keyboard, Remote Control, etc 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Input Devices: Mouse, Keyboard, Remote Control, etc 

Listening / Pay Attention

Language Arts > Communication > Media Literacy / Viewing > Comprehension > Listening / Pay Attention

Output Devices: Monitor, Printer, etc 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Output Devices: Monitor, Printer, etc 

Respond

Language Arts > Communication > Listening Strategies / Context > Respond

Responsible use and care of equipment

Library Media > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Responsible use and care of equipment

Responsible use and care of equipment 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Responsible use and care of equipment 

Student Evaluation and Selection of Tools / Software for Task 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Student Use > Student Evaluation and Selection of Tools / Software for Task 

Vocabulary Development

Language Arts > Communication > Speaking Strategies / Presentations > Vocabulary Development

Vocabulary Development

Language Arts > Communication > Listening Strategies / Context > Vocabulary Development

Vocabulary and Abbreviations 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Vocabulary and Abbreviations 
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  • You might want to point out to students that while most computers have the same basic components, they don't all look alike. Holding this discussion might be especially helpful if your classroom or lab includes computers that don't have towers. If that's the case, you might want to point out where a processor is stored in the students' computers.

  • To help reinforce students' recognition of computer parts, you can have students name computer parts as a class. For example, on a demonstration table, randomly place parts of a computer (often computer labs will have leftover or defective parts laying around), including items such as a keyboard, mouse, tower, monitor, speakers, and so forth. Then, choose a student to identify one of the parts. Continue to have volunteers name one computer part until all the parts on the table have been named. Then, have students sit in front of their computers. This time, name a part out loud and have the students point to the part on their systems. Repeat the process until the students have pointed to each part of the computer.

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