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Teacher-Facing Resources

Type:Lesson

Estimated Time:18 minutes

Grades:4-5

Score Type:Automatically Graded

Work completed by a student will be automatically graded and the grade will be sent to the Learning Management System (LMS) gradebook

Available Languages: English, Spanish


Vocabulary: data, database, field, form, record


Primary Objectives:

  • Student learns how to plan for a database.
  • Student learns to start a new database file.
  • Student learns to create and define fields.
  • Student learns how to enter data into a database record.
  • Student learns how to review and edit data.
  • Student learns how to delete records and fields.

Secondary Objectives:

  • Student learns about Mercury, solar system planets

Subjects:

Critical Thinking and Decision Making Process 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Student Use > Critical Thinking and Decision Making Process 

Data Formats 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Data Formats 

Database Applications 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Software Applications > Database Applications 

Internet

Science > Concepts and Processes > Tools / Instruments > Software Tools > Internet

Problem Solving 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Student Use > Problem Solving 
  • The database lessons incorporate information about our solar system by following two robots from the fictional company S-SPACE (Solar System Planets Are Cool Enterprises) on their mission to find the perfect location to build a S-SPACE City. This lesson’s setting is Mercury. You might want to show and discuss facts about Mercury with students before they take the EasyTech lesson.

  • Students should know that the first step in creating a database is planning.

  • Students work with data types in this lesson as they learn how to build a database. You might want to remind students that a field formatted as a Boolean data type requires Yes or No criteria in the field. For example, a field named Rings could be formatted as a Boolean data type because the criteria would be Yes or No. Similarly, remind students that the OLE (object linking and embedding) data type can be used to include images in a datasheet.

  • Students should know how to use the Save As dialog box.

  • The lesson shows students how to assign the AutoNumber data type to the ID field by selecting AutoNumber in the Data Type list box. In Open Office, students would use the Integer data type and then click Yes in the AutoValue list box. You should make sure students know how to assign the AutoNumber or AutoValue data type on your school’s database software.

  • The lesson shows students using the Primary Key button. In some database programs, students may have to right-click a gray box next to the field row and choose Primary Key. You should make sure students know how to assign a primary key to a field on your school’s database software.

  • The lesson shows students how to apply a style set to database forms in a wizard. Some database applications only allow students to choose a form color and border style. You might want to make sure students know how to format database forms on your school’s database software.

  • Students should know the basic steps for inserting a picture.

  • Database images must be bitmaps.

  • In some database programs, students will have to right-click a picture field to insert an image instead of using the Insert menu.

  • In the Spanish version of this lesson, the audio presents the data types in Spanish while the onscreen data types are shown in English. You might want to review the English terms for the data types with students before they view the Spanish lesson.

  • Databases can seem complex, but students can create effective databases if they clearly understand all the parts of a database. To aid in student understanding, hold a class discussion in which the class looks at an existing database and deconstructs it into datasheet parts (such as records, fields, data types, criteria, and so forth). Next, have students find and deconstruct another database on their own. They can show their work by drawing a datasheet and writing field names at the tops of the columns (you might want to remind students to include an ID field formatted as the primary key in their datasheets). Below the field names, students can write the data type for each field. In the third row, students should add a sample record. After students have deconstructed their databases, have them exchange their datasheets with a partner so they can “test” each other’s datasheets by adding a new record. Allow students time to provide feedback to each other, and then hold a class discussion to reflect on successes and discoveries.
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