Teacher-Facing Resources

Type:Lesson

Estimated Time:15 minutes

Grades:K-2

Score Type:Automatically Graded

Work completed by a student will be automatically graded and the grade will be sent to the Learning Management System (LMS) gradebook

Available Languages: English, Spanish


Primary Objectives:

  • Student learn that directions are a list of steps that are done in a certain order to do something, make something or solve problems.
  • Student learns that directions can involve both actions and things.
  • Student analyzes information, or data, in order to organize that information into useful and accurate directions.
  • Student learns how to test a set of directions to make sure that all steps are listed and in the correct order.
  • Student explores problems to develop solutions.
  • Student learns that computers use directions to accomplish tasks and help solve problems.

Secondary Objectives:

  • Student looks for and makes sense of structure.
  • Student learns how to organize and interpret data.
  • Student uses active listening skills to understand information and follow directions.

Subjects:

Algorithm Development 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Programming > Algorithm Development 

Algorithms 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Programming > Algorithms 

Analyze Algorithms 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Programming > Analyze Algorithms 

Critical / Analytical Thinking

Language Arts > Life Skills Daily Life > Critical / Analytical Thinking

Design Sorting Algorithms 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Programming > Design Sorting Algorithms 

Engineering

Science > Concepts and Processes > Problem Solving > Engineering

Experimentation

Technology Education > Information Technology > Technology Use In Society > Design Process > Experimentation

Explain How Object Works

Science > Concepts and Processes > Structure or Function > Explain How Object Works

Instructions

Language Arts > Communication > Listening Strategies / Context > Follow Directions > Instructions

Listening / Pay Attention

Language Arts > Communication > Media Literacy / Viewing > Comprehension > Listening / Pay Attention

Look for and make use of structure

Mathematics > Process Standards > Common Core > Look for and make use of structure

Methods/Steps/Strategies

Mathematics > Process Standards > Computation > Methods/Steps/Strategies

Methods/Steps/Strategies

Mathematics > Process Standards > Problem Solving > Methods/Steps/Strategies

Problem Solving

Social Studies > Process and Literacy Skills > Social Science - History > Problem Solving

Problem Solving 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Student Use > Problem Solving 

Problem-solving

Mathematics > Process Standards > Models/Representations > Problem-solving

Programming

Science > History / Technology / Social Perspectives > Computer Science > Programming

Steps to Complete a Task

Technology Education > Information Technology > Technology Use In Society > Design Process > Steps to Complete a Task

Technical / Specialized

Language Arts > Communication > Listening Strategies / Context > Content Specific > Technical / Specialized

Vocabulary Development

Language Arts > Communication > Listening Strategies / Context > Vocabulary Development

Vocabulary and Abbreviations 

Technology Education > Information Technology > Basic Operations and Concepts > Vocabulary and Abbreviations 

how-to / process writing

Language Arts > Writing > Directions Instructions > how-to / process writing
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  • There are many ways to introduce this topic to students, since directions are an essential part of the classroom environment. Ask students to write or draw out the directions they follow to accomplish a certain task, such as playing a game, cleaning up a learning station or a recess activity, walking to a certain area of the school or neighborhood, or a classroom routine that you have been teaching.

  • Give your students the opportunity to further practice creating and following directions by asking your students to come up with the best way to make a paper airplane or a paper hat (more examples include origami, snowflakes, kites). You may want to give a brief example of how to make the paper creation, and then have students practice on their own to research how they make the object, adding their own ideas and methods. The students will then write or draw out their directions. Have students trade directions with another student. Students should follow the directions and make a new paper creation. How did the creation turn out? Were there steps missing in the directions? Partners can evaluate how the final product compares to the writer's intended product. Volunteers can share their directions and final products with the class.

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